Home Health Is Your Child Suffering From Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

Is Your Child Suffering From Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

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Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

If you’re a parent with a child who suffers from pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, you’ve probably wondered if your child has OSA. In this article, you’ll learn about its causes, symptoms, and treatment options. You’ll also learn about some of the steps you should take to make sure your child’s breathing is not interrupted during sleep.

Symptoms

Parents should consider getting their child checked out for obstructive sleep apnea if they notice that their child stops breathing periodically during the night. However, the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea may be similar to those of other medical conditions, so it’s important to see a doctor to rule out other conditions. In addition to a sleep physician, pediatric obstructive sleep apnea may be diagnosed by referral to a pulmonary doctor or an otolaryngologist.

Basic Symptoms If Your children Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea

  • In addition to the snoring associated with obstructive sleep hypnosis,
  • children suffering from the condition may have poor concentration or poor attention span.
  • Children with this disorder may exhibit hyperactivity and sleepiness during the day.
  • Their behavior may also be disruptive.

While pediatric obstructive sleep arousal is a common disorder among children,its symptoms and associated health problems are more serious than those of adult OSA. It has been associated with neurocognitive problems, impaired growth, and cardiovascular complications. Regardless of age, it’s essential for children to have a sleep specialist evaluate them. If you suspect your child has OSA, make sure that they get the correct diagnosis and treatment.

The signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep aplasia are similar to those of other health problems. To get the proper diagnosis, a healthcare provider will ask about your child’s sleep habits and health history. Asleep study will be ordered or your child will be referred to a sleep expert. Some parents opt to have their child tested at home using a sleep apnea device.

Unlike kids, even adults are susceptible to sleep apnea and there are various types of sleep apnea that the adults might actually suffer from.

Causes

There are many different causes of pediatric obstructive sleep affliction.

  • A child with enlarged tonsils or adenoids may experience sleep apnea because of a variety of reasons. Inflammation or genetics can cause enlarged tonsils, and these enlargements may narrow the airway and make breathing during sleep difficult. The condition can be more severe in children if there are enlarged tonsils or adenoids.
  • Children with obstructive sleep apnea may experience periodic, recurrent infections of their ear, nose, or throat. While these symptoms may not be indicative of obstructive sleep apnea, parents should visit their child’s pediatrician and consult with a physician. A physician will refer children with obstructive sleep apnea to a pulmonary or otolaryngologist.
  • Patients with obstructive sleep hypnosis often experience a number of different episodes of interrupted breathing during sleep. These episodes may be brief or prolonged, and they may be complete or partial. The only way to confirm a diagnosis is to perform overnight polysomnography. This test is typically done at the child’s usual bedtime. However, some children with obstructive sleep apnea may also experience other disorders.

The causes of pediatric obstructive sleep affliction vary from person to person, and each child will respond differently to different treatments. Treatment will vary, and the treatment chosen should be based on the severity of the condition and your child’s preferences. The best option for your child’s specific case will depend on the age of the child, the severity of the disorder, and the severity of their symptoms.

Sleep apnea is common among adults as well and there are various factors that contribute to the same. While sleep apnea basically means disruption in the sleep and health quality,  fixing your squeaky bed might actually get you a comfortable sleep.

Treatment

The first clinical indication for treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea was identifying the disorder itself in 1976. Since then, the diagnosis has been made based on the findings of a study in 1976. Adenotonsillectomy has been the standard initial therapy for pediatric OSA, and other guidelines echo the AAP recommendations. However, the benefits and risks of surgical adenotonsillectomy have remained unclear.

  • For moderate-to-severe OSA, nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the only treatment option.
  • In children, compliance with CPAP has been difficult, and it can change the shape of a child’s face. Behavioral interventions and logistic support may help overcome this barrier. The aim of treatment in children is to reduce the duration and severity of apnea and to improve sleep quality.

If a diagnosis is made, a sleep study involving a polysomnogram is necessary to evaluate the underlying causes of the disorder and determine the appropriate treatment.

  • An overnight oxygen recording of the child’s sleep quality is the most reliable test of the condition, although it sometimes fails to provide a conclusive diagnosis.
  •  Children who have a strong suspicion of pediatric OSA may still need to undergo polysomnography, an electrocardiogram that involves wire-attached sensor patches.

The ultimate objective of the surgery

In pediatric OSA, surgical adenotonsillectomy is often the first line of treatment. While the CHAT trial did not analyze this subgroup, it showed that patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy had a greater AHI than children with less severe OSA. Therefore, surgical treatment of pediatric OSA is not the definitive answer for the disease, but it is highly recommended to undergo it in the early stages if symptoms worsen.

In pediatric OSA, surgical adenotonsillectomy is often the first line of treatment. While the CHAT trial did not analyze this subgroup, it showed that patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy had a greater AHI than children with less severe OSA. Therefore, surgical treatment of pediatric OSA is not the definitive answer for the disease, but it is highly recommended to undergo it in the early stages if symptoms worsen.

Conclusion

Pediatric OSA is not uncommon among children but is treatable. It must be diagnosed and then the regular non-surgical treatment must be initiated. If the non-surgical treatment yields the desired result then it is good for the child or if the symptoms and the disease continue then a proper surgery after diagnosis is recommended as a continuation of this disease might lead to other severe health complications in the child.

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